Tag Archives: Butter

recipe goodness :: how to make homemade butter

How to Make Homemade Butter

Homemade Butter

Butter is something that is easy to take for granted. Whether to cook with or butter your toast, that lovely yellow cream is something we use almost daily. Yet rarely do we think of it as something we can make ourselves. But man is it easy. And really, really good when you do. Buy the best, local heavy cream you can find, plug in your electric beaters and start schmearing.

Homemade Butter

1 pint heavy cream {I use Grazin’ Angus Acres grass-fed}
Flaky salt to taste {Jacobsen Sea Salt or Maldon}

Optional add-ins: Honey, Thyme, Sage, Rosemary, Orange  or Lemon Zest, Whatever your heart desires

  1. Pour cream in a metal bowl and beat with electric beaters on high until the cream becomes solid and separates from the buttermilk {will become a bright yellow}.
  2. Pour into a cheesecloth-lined strainer with a bowl underneath to catch the liquid and place in the fridge for an hour to allow more of the buttermilk to separate.
  3. On a clean surface or cutting board, press with cold hands or a flexible dough scraper to knead the butter and remove more buttermilk. This is also the time to mix in any flavors if making flavored butter. Sprinkle salt to taste and then form into a ball, roll into a log or press into a container to store if you don’t eat it all right away.
Beat cream until it separates and looks like this

Beat cream until it separates and looks like this

And then strain and knead until it looks like this

And then strain and knead until it looks like this


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recipe goodness :: mastering julia child’s fillet of sole meuniere #jc100

Julia Child's Sole Meuniere

Julia Child’s Sole Meuniere

Filet of Sole Meuniere was Julia’s first-ever meal in France.  She described the sole as “a morsel of perfection” and “the most exciting meal” of her life.  It was this simple preparation of sole that inspired  Julia’s 40-year love affair with food and the start of a cooking revolution in America. The dish takes less than ten minutes to prepare and since the filets go for a swim in clarified butter, there is no shortage of rich “French” flavor. Pour yourself a nice glass of chablis and take a petit voyage to France for dinner.

“There is no substitute for the taste of butter in good cooking…” — Julia Child

Sole Meuniere

Fillet of Sole Meunière

Serves 6

6 skinless, boneless sole or other thin fillets
Salt and fresh ground pepper
1/4 cup of flour or so for a plate
4 tablespoons clarified butter
3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
4-6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 lemon cut into wedges

  1. Dry the fish, remove and bones, score, trim and lay flat on wax paper.
  2. Dust the fillets with salt and pepper. Just before sauteing drop each fillet into the flour to coat each side, shaking off any excess.
  3. Set the frying pan over high heat and film with 1/16 inch of clarified butter. When the butter is very hot, but not browning, rapidly lay each fillet side by side leaving a little space between each (don’t overcrowd).
  4. Saute 1-2 minutes on both sides, turning carefully so as to not break the fillet. The fish is done when just springy. Immediately remove from the pan to a platter or plates.
  5. Sprinkle each fillet generously with parsley.
  6. Wipe the pan completely clean, set over high heat and melt with new butter until bubbling.
  7. Pour over fillets — the parsley will bubble up nicely. Season with salt, serve with lemon wedges immediately.

Bon appetit!
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Do This!: Celebrate Julia Child’s 100th Birthday 

Excerpted from The Way to Cook by Julia Child. Copyright © 1989 by Julia Child. Reprinted with permission from the publisher Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc.


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recipe goodness :: how to cook the perfect poached egg with melted ramp butter

Perfect Poached Egg with Melted Ramp Butter

They don’t call them Spring chickens for nothin’. The grass is newly growing and our little pecking friends are spreading their wings, enjoying the fresh Spring forage. This is the season when truly free range eggs can especially be savored. And seeing as how they are my favorite food, I thought I would dress them up with another Spring favorite — ramps {looks like a spring onion, smells like garlic — a match made in heaven!} After poaching the eggs, one little dollop of the intensely flavorful ramp butter will make a dish so good, it  should be illegal. So swing by your local greenmarket, pick up the goods and make yourself {or your mother} a spectacular Spring brunch. More Mother’s Day Breakfast Inspir-egg-tion below!

Poached Egg with Melted Ramp Butter
Serves 2 

2 free range farm-fresh eggs
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1 tablespoon ramp butter {recipe below}
Salt and pepper to taste

Ramp Butter
Makes 1 lb

1lb unsalted butter
3.6 ounces ramps
zest of 2 lemons
1 teaspoon Maldon salt

  1. Blend ramp butter ingredients together in a food processor and add to an air-tight container to keep in the fridge.
  2. Bring a small sauce pot of water to a boil.
  3. Add vinegar.
  4. Crack your eggs into separate small bowls.
  5. Turn the boiling water down to a low simmer. Swirl the water into a whirlpool and pour the egg into the pot, one at a time, but close in timing.
  6. Cook for 3-4 minutes until white is firm and then remove with a slotted spoon into a serving bowl.
  7. Add 1/2 tablespoon of ramp butter to the top of each warm egg, allowing it to melt and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.


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